The exterior of a white Hyundai Ioniq

Hyundai Ioniq review

The Hyundai Ioniq offers a relaxing drive and has a great driving position, giving you good visibility of the road. Hyundai also has a superb reputation for reliability.

Pros

  • Excellent level of standard equipment
  • Very efficient hybrid models
  • Superb five-year warranty

Cons

  • Some low-quality interior materials
  • The ride isn’t the best in the segment
  • Only available as an electric vehicle or a hybrid

Summary

“Great value with the choice of hybrid, PHEV (plug-in hybrid) or fully electric, whichever suits your lifestyle.”

If you’re looking to swap petrol or diesel for something that’s more economical and better for the environment, then the Ioniq is worth a look.

You can choose from a regular petrol-electric hybrid, a plug-in hybrid or a full battery-electric vehicle. The battery-electric vehicle gives you a claimed driving range of 174 miles which will suit most people, especially if you live and work in an urban area.

If you commute in town but like to venture further afield at the weekend, then the plug-in hybrid is the one that offers the best of both worlds. It can travel up to 30 miles in electric-only mode.

If you’re not ready to plug in just yet, then the regular hybrid is a great option with loads of interior space and plenty of practical features for family or business drivers.  

Except for the full EV, which has slightly less space, all options are very practical for everyday use and ride well.

Controls shot of the Hyundai Ioniq

What’s the interior like?

“Well equipped even in standard models, but it has some cheap feeling materials.”

The Ioniq has some plastic trims which are generally hard-wearing, a relatively well laid out dashboard and a fairly basic touchscreen infotainment system. It’s all finished with some nice, calming blue accents.

The instrumentation is clear with a digital central dial that contains most of the essential driving information. The buttons on the steering wheel, infotainment and climate control are all fairly easy to use. 

The level of equipment is excellent across the range, but go for Premium or above if you want Apple CarPlay, Android Auto and sat nav.

The seats are comfortable even on longer journeys and there’s lots of space for those in the back seats. Boot space is reasonable at 443 litres, so you’ll be able to fit in a few bags if you’re planning a weekend away. You’ll lose more than 100 litres if you go for the EV version as the battery takes up valuable space.

The interior of a Hyundai Ioniq with steering wheel and dashboard in shot

What’s it like to drive?

“It's all about comfort and relaxation on the road.”

All the Ioniq models are designed to give you a relaxing drive. The hybrid’s 1.6-litre petrol engine powers the car most of the time, but in electric mode it glides around town almost silently. 

The dual-clutch gearbox is relatively smooth and efficient, while the steering is light enough for easy town driving. You can also select different driving modes that alter the way the suspension feels and the car drives.

Things are different in the EV version. Although it’s not much quicker than the hybrids, it feels like it is with its instant acceleration. 

The paddles on the steering wheel aren’t for changing gear, but are for increasing or decreasing the amount of regenerative braking (a system that captures the energy that's normally lost when braking) that charges the batteries. This can take some getting used to. The EV is also heavier, which means some might find it slightly less comfortable.

The self-charging model allows you to drive for short periods on electric power and also uses regenerative braking.

The exterior of a white Hyundai Ioniq

Is it cost-efficient to buy and run?

“Competitive prices and efficient hybrid or electric power.”

It’s cheaper than its rivals, the Prius and Nissan Leaf, which is a great start for the Ioniq. You’ll pay more for the PHEV version and even more for the EV but they’re still good value. 

Official fuel consumption claims for the hybrid models are up to 78 mpg, with the PHEV at an impressive 148 mpg. As with most cars, you should expect that to be lower in real world driving. 

Service and maintenance costs are similar to rivals and Hyundai provides a five-year, unlimited mileage warranty that most used models will still have.

Battery shot of the Hyundai Ioniq

Hoe reliable and safe is it?

“Excellent warranty provides long term peace of mind.”

Hyundai has a great reliability record, which is one of the brand’s strong selling points and the Ioniq shouldn’t be any different. The extensive Hyundai warranty also provides excellent peace of mind for buyers of previously-owned cars.

All models have a five-star Euro NCAP crash test safety rating, while extensive standard equipment, including lane departure warning and autonomous emergency braking, make the Ioniq a safe bet.

Engine shot of the Hyundai Ioniq

Which one is best for you?

Best for economy - Premium Electric

Best for family - 1.6 GDi hybrid Premium

Best for fun - Premium Electric

With three different types of Ioniq, it’s worth considering which one will best suit your lifestyle. If you’re not ready for a full EV, the PHEV is a great option with up to 30 miles of electric-only range. 

All models have a high level of standard equipment, so the SE Connect will suit most people. 

Have a look at Premium spec models as they have a great infotainment system as well as other nice comfort features, including heated front seats and reverse parking assistance.

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